Chronicling the Unexceptional.

A collection of things I love. Pinup, vintage, BDSM, lingerie, beautiful humans and literary quotes.

And it’s hard to hate someone once you understand them.

Lucy Christopher, Stolen: A Letter to My Captor (via sixambootycall)

(via fueledsir)

bdsmsadomasochism:

TEMPERATURE PLAY - is a form of BDSM sensual play where objects and substances are used to manipulate/stimulate the body’s neuroreceptors for heat and cold for sensual effect. Blindfolds are often used to intensify the effects, and bondage can also amplify the experience.
 WAX PLAY - can be one of the most tantalizing types of play on the skin that can produce marvelous, stimulating pleasures. But it can also be the cause for an extreme burn if applied improperly. Because of the dangers that are inherent to burning temperatures, some may categorize wax play as “edge play”. By learning basic knowledge and techniques will enable you to safely play with wax. Remember, safety must always be the primary focus when dealing with unpredictable mediums, such as hot wax.
 SAFETY - Different types of candles and different crock pot temperatures produce different temperatures of wax that can range from warm and soothing to dangerously hot wax. There is significant difference between individuals’ tolerance for heat, which can vary depending on exactly where the wax is applied.
 Wax can splatter into the eyes. Wax that is too hot can cause serious burns. Crock pots and wax therapy spas almost always have heat controls, not temperature controls; temperature will vary over time. Wax may be difficult to remove, particularly from areas with hair. A flea comb or a sharp knife may be necessary for wax removal; use of a knife for this purpose requires special skills, though a plastic card can work as well. Oiling skin before waxing makes removal easier. Remember that some oils will conduct heat and prolong the extreme temperatures from the hot wax. Mineral oil is generally used to oil skin.
Wax may pool and concentrate heat. Wax heated in any sort of pot must be stirred vigorously or there can be dangerous temperature variations. Some people may be allergic to perfumes and dyes. Whatever is above a burning candle can get very hot, even at distances that may be surprising. Temperature can be varied based on the height from which you drip, drop, or pour the wax. Check temperature by dropping some on yourself, using the back of your hand and your inner forearm. Keeping the candle 18 inches from the skin is considered a safe distance. Some fetish garments will melt or burn, sticking to the skin and causing serious burns. Anything with nylon, vinyl, PVC, patent leather, or other synthetic fabrics can be a problem.
TYPES OF WAX
Paraffin – most common, inexpensive, burns at low temperatures (115°F - 145°F) and therefore recommended best for wax play. Soy – becoming popular, more expensive, burns clean at a low temperature (120°F - 150°F) and therefore recommended for wax play. Always ask your bottom beforehand of any allergies they have. Beeswax – less common, burns at a very high temperature (142°F - 150°F) and therefore not recommended for wax play. Bayberry – the rarest and most expensive, it is also known as “myrtle wax”. Although it has an extremely low melt point of 116°F, it is an excessively hard wax.
 If you are using candles and are not sure how hot they are, cut a piece off and rub it in your hands. If, after a little bit, it becomes like putty, it is a low temperature candle. If it stays hard, it is high temperature. Also, another sign is how long do they burn during normal use. Religious candles are some of the lowest temperature candles available. They are normally about 124°F melting point.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Colour – Dye coloured candles hold a slightly higher temperature of only 1°- 3° and is not a problem for use in wax play. Because pigment colour, can separate once melted, it will also affect the temperature of the melted wax by 3°or 4°. Warning: the pigment itself can hold much higher temperatures once separated and can cause burns. It makes good practice to use pure paraffin as the first coating on the skin. An easy way to add colour to plain wax is to add a crayola crayon to the wax pot. One small caution is there is a chance that the dye colour may stain skin.
 Scent – Scents added to wax will only have a temperature burn difference of 1°- 2° and is not considered to significantly affect application techniques. Be aware that some people are allergic or sensitive to certain fragrances; so ask ahead of time to prevent mishaps.
 CANDLE TYPES
Taper – They are tapered at the top and wider at the bottom allowing for even burning. Because the wax is coming directly from the flame, no pooling is allowed to form (cooling), thus producing the highest temperature of all the candles; therefore extreme care should be taken when using them. The melt point can be 140°F and higher depending on the wax used: paraffin, beeswax, or bayberry wax.
 Pillar - They can take any shape and size but always form in an equal diameter. Melted wax is allowed to pool in the surrounding area of the wick, allowing cooling of the wax. Nearest to the wick can be a temperature as high as 250°F as it is drawn up into the wick for fuel. As wax moves away from the flame (about 1¼”), it pools and the radiant temperature cools to about 140°F. From 1¼” to 1½” away from the flame, the wax can cool to 127°F. Moving more than 1½” away from the flame, the wax cools to ambient room temperature. A common problem found is the hot area around the wick starts to sink and the outer rim of wax never gets hot enough to melt causing a tunnel effect. To prevent this from happening, while the candle is still warm after extinguishing, push and turn in the sides using your fingers/thumb to get the outer wax closer to the centre, bring down the column of wax.
 Voltives – poured into moulds and can be any shape, but size is usually limited to allow it to be placed in votive glass containers or allowed to float in water. Usually paraffin wax is used. The melting point can vary from 128°F to 134°F. The ease of use makes this the most popular.
 Tealights – poured into thin metal cups using paraffin wax. Pooling does not occur and therefore the temperature can be 136°F or higher. Better used as ambiance to a room rather than for wax play.
 Wax Bath – an electrical vat or fondue pot containing paraffin wax. A ladle can be used to collect the wax and pour it on the body. Use only vats that have a temperature thermostat, which can be regulated. Stir the wax often. Turn the heat up high to initially melt the wax. Then turn it down and allow a skim coat to form on the top. Stir the bath of wax and adjust thermostat for the correct temperature setting.
 Dripless – this usually applies to formal taper candlesticks . During the dipping process, a special harder outer layer of wax is applied, which makes a “cup” that holds the melted wax. This prevents the liquid wax to run down the candle sides. These candles are not recommended for wax play because of the high heat content.
 Drippy - additives are combined with the wax to allow the wax to soften quickly and drip. They have a low melting point and are great for wax play.
 APPLICATION
Safe temperatures to use when applying wax are 110°F - 139°F depending upon preparation within the scene. Less sensitive areas are the back and chest. Proper area lighting is important to be able to see the amount of wax you are distributing. Once the wax is removed, the skin is ultra-stimulated and the slightest touch will have him/her squirming.
If you are going to use different types of candles, it is best to have a layer of pure paraffin on the skin first as a barrier layer. This will diffuse the heat over a larger area. Give time between drops to allow that wax to cool and the bottom to react to the sensations. Placing a wax drop on top of another drop creates a penetrating deep heat and requires a longer cooling period, so take your time. Apply a steady series of drops and spread the drops out around the entire area. Rotate candles around while dripping so they burn evenly.
Pillar candles’ pool of wax is what is useful for wax play and should be allowed to regenerate as often as needed. To apply, hold the lit candle directly over the body and tilt it to drip the pooled wax while moving it over the body.
Taper candles require much more care while using because they burn at a much higher temperature. The old school thought is to adjust the height of the drop by raising your arm & varying the distance. This allows the drop of wax to cool as it falls downward hitting your target. Latest tests show that the degree of cooling is so negligible that this method is not needed. Besides, dripping wax from those distances causes splashing of wax everywhere; getting onto clothes, hair, face, shoes and surrounding areas. Skip all the mess, build your protective barrier layer of wax first and then have fun sending your bottom into ecstasy.
Votives can be placed directly on your subject if a thick layer of wax is applied beforehand to help insulate the skin from the higher temperatures. Warning: Peel label off bottom of candle first and melt bottom to assure a sturdy placement. As the votive wax melts, the spilling will add to the bottom’s sensation with each breath they take. This may remind the bottom to stay still during this fun play, or not. Imagine your canvas topped with coloured votives slowly spilling wax down the sides of body, chest, and waist. Votives can also be placed in glass containers and allowed to pool and then be poured on the body for a heavenly warm sensation.
Container application is accomplished by tilting the holder enough that the wax pours out of the top. Try not to allow the flame to touch the opposite side of glass, which will produce soot on that area. If this happens, just wipe with towel after is cools. It is important to allow time for the wax to pool, therefore it is recommended to have numerous container candles.
Wax Bath/Vat application is accomplished by using a paintbrush, a ladle, or even your hands. Have a drip plate available to catch extra wax dripping off the brush. To create darker colours apply multiple layers of wax; allow each layer to harden before applying the next. The ladle allows for more flow of wax. For a full hands on play, use your own hands, cupped, to scoop up the wax and spread it onto the skin of your partner. Having your hands sensually exploring, pinching, and rubbing.
CLEAN UP
Using a wet ice cube to chill the wax on the skin is an easy way to remove wax. It is also a nice double sensation of mediums. To peel the wax off, use a knife, scraper, or a fine edge to loosen the edges and then grab it with your fingers and gently pull the wax over itself. A plastic scraper is useful to get the small areas of wax left over on the skin. The scrubbie will also get off the small bits of wax remaining by gently rubbing it over the skin. To get wax out of hair, use a flea comb. It is not a good idea to use a leather flogger or whip to remove wax – it gets everywhere and also on your expensive toy. Besides, you just gave a pleasurable, relaxing, sensual, erotic, and luxurious play scene. Leave the stingy ouchies for another time.
Clean up is easy if you used plastic to cover any area beforehand. Do not re-use any wax you have taken off of skin. It is contaminated with skin flakes, oils, and dirt.
If wax got on your clothing, boil them in a large pot to release the wax from the fabric.
Any wax left in your hair will easily come off by showering with a conditioner.

bdsmsadomasochism:

TEMPERATURE PLAY - is a form of BDSM sensual play where objects and substances are used to manipulate/stimulate the body’s neuroreceptors for heat and cold for sensual effect. Blindfolds are often used to intensify the effects, and bondage can also amplify the experience.


WAX PLAY - can be one of the most tantalizing types of play on the skin that can produce marvelous, stimulating pleasures. But it can also be the cause for an extreme burn if applied improperly. Because of the dangers that are inherent to burning temperatures, some may categorize wax play as “edge play”. By learning basic knowledge and techniques will enable you to safely play with wax. Remember, safety must always be the primary focus when dealing with unpredictable mediums, such as hot wax.


SAFETY - Different types of candles and different crock pot temperatures produce different temperatures of wax that can range from warm and soothing to dangerously hot wax. There is significant difference between individuals’ tolerance for heat, which can vary depending on exactly where the wax is applied.


Wax can splatter into the eyes. Wax that is too hot can cause serious burns. Crock pots and wax therapy spas almost always have heat controls, not temperature controls; temperature will vary over time. Wax may be difficult to remove, particularly from areas with hair. A flea comb or a sharp knife may be necessary for wax removal; use of a knife for this purpose requires special skills, though a plastic card can work as well. Oiling skin before waxing makes removal easier. Remember that some oils will conduct heat and prolong the extreme temperatures from the hot wax. Mineral oil is generally used to oil skin.

Wax may pool and concentrate heat. Wax heated in any sort of pot must be stirred vigorously or there can be dangerous temperature variations. Some people may be allergic to perfumes and dyes. Whatever is above a burning candle can get very hot, even at distances that may be surprising. Temperature can be varied based on the height from which you drip, drop, or pour the wax. Check temperature by dropping some on yourself, using the back of your hand and your inner forearm. Keeping the candle 18 inches from the skin is considered a safe distance. Some fetish garments will melt or burn, sticking to the skin and causing serious burns. Anything with nylon, vinyl, PVC, patent leather, or other synthetic fabrics can be a problem.

TYPES OF WAX

Paraffin – most common, inexpensive, burns at low temperatures (115°F - 145°F) and therefore recommended best for wax play.
Soy – becoming popular, more expensive, burns clean at a low temperature (120°F - 150°F) and therefore recommended for wax play. Always ask your bottom beforehand of any allergies they have.
Beeswax – less common, burns at a very high temperature (142°F - 150°F) and therefore not recommended for wax play.
Bayberry – the rarest and most expensive, it is also known as “myrtle wax”. Although it has an extremely low melt point of 116°F, it is an excessively hard wax.


If you are using candles and are not sure how hot they are, cut a piece off and rub it in your hands. If, after a little bit, it becomes like putty, it is a low temperature candle. If it stays hard, it is high temperature. Also, another sign is how long do they burn during normal use. Religious candles are some of the lowest temperature candles available. They are normally about 124°F melting point.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Colour – Dye coloured candles hold a slightly higher temperature of only 1°- 3° and is not a problem for use in wax play. Because pigment colour, can separate once melted, it will also affect the temperature of the melted wax by 3°or 4°. Warning: the pigment itself can hold much higher temperatures once separated and can cause burns. It makes good practice to use pure paraffin as the first coating on the skin. An easy way to add colour to plain wax is to add a crayola crayon to the wax pot. One small caution is there is a chance that the dye colour may stain skin.


Scent – Scents added to wax will only have a temperature burn difference of 1°- 2° and is not considered to significantly affect application techniques. Be aware that some people are allergic or sensitive to certain fragrances; so ask ahead of time to prevent mishaps.


CANDLE TYPES

Taper – They are tapered at the top and wider at the bottom allowing for even burning. Because the wax is coming directly from the flame, no pooling is allowed to form (cooling), thus producing the highest temperature of all the candles; therefore extreme care should be taken when using them. The melt point can be 140°F and higher depending on the wax used: paraffin, beeswax, or bayberry wax.


Pillar - They can take any shape and size but always form in an equal diameter. Melted wax is allowed to pool in the surrounding area of the wick, allowing cooling of the wax. Nearest to the wick can be a temperature as high as 250°F as it is drawn up into the wick for fuel. As wax moves away from the flame (about 1¼”), it pools and the radiant temperature cools to about 140°F. From 1¼” to 1½” away from the flame, the wax can cool to 127°F. Moving more than 1½” away from the flame, the wax cools to ambient room temperature. A common problem found is the hot area around the wick starts to sink and the outer rim of wax never gets hot enough to melt causing a tunnel effect. To prevent this from happening, while the candle is still warm after extinguishing, push and turn in the sides using your fingers/thumb to get the outer wax closer to the centre, bring down the column of wax.


Voltives – poured into moulds and can be any shape, but size is usually limited to allow it to be placed in votive glass containers or allowed to float in water. Usually paraffin wax is used. The melting point can vary from 128°F to 134°F. The ease of use makes this the most popular.


Tealights – poured into thin metal cups using paraffin wax. Pooling does not occur and therefore the temperature can be 136°F or higher. Better used as ambiance to a room rather than for wax play.


Wax Bath – an electrical vat or fondue pot containing paraffin wax. A ladle can be used to collect the wax and pour it on the body. Use only vats that have a temperature thermostat, which can be regulated. Stir the wax often. Turn the heat up high to initially melt the wax. Then turn it down and allow a skim coat to form on the top. Stir the bath of wax and adjust thermostat for the correct temperature setting.


Dripless – this usually applies to formal taper candlesticks . During the dipping process, a special harder outer layer of wax is applied, which makes a “cup” that holds the melted wax. This prevents the liquid wax to run down the candle sides. These candles are not recommended for wax play because of the high heat content.


Drippy - additives are combined with the wax to allow the wax to soften quickly and drip. They have a low melting point and are great for wax play.


APPLICATION

Safe temperatures to use when applying wax are 110°F - 139°F depending upon preparation within the scene. Less sensitive areas are the back and chest. Proper area lighting is important to be able to see the amount of wax you are distributing. Once the wax is removed, the skin is ultra-stimulated and the slightest touch will have him/her squirming.

If you are going to use different types of candles, it is best to have a layer of pure paraffin on the skin first as a barrier layer. This will diffuse the heat over a larger area. Give time between drops to allow that wax to cool and the bottom to react to the sensations. Placing a wax drop on top of another drop creates a penetrating deep heat and requires a longer cooling period, so take your time. Apply a steady series of drops and spread the drops out around the entire area. Rotate candles around while dripping so they burn evenly.

Pillar candles’ pool of wax is what is useful for wax play and should be allowed to regenerate as often as needed. To apply, hold the lit candle directly over the body and tilt it to drip the pooled wax while moving it over the body.

Taper candles require much more care while using because they burn at a much higher temperature. The old school thought is to adjust the height of the drop by raising your arm & varying the distance. This allows the drop of wax to cool as it falls downward hitting your target. Latest tests show that the degree of cooling is so negligible that this method is not needed. Besides, dripping wax from those distances causes splashing of wax everywhere; getting onto clothes, hair, face, shoes and surrounding areas. Skip all the mess, build your protective barrier layer of wax first and then have fun sending your bottom into ecstasy.

Votives can be placed directly on your subject if a thick layer of wax is applied beforehand to help insulate the skin from the higher temperatures. Warning: Peel label off bottom of candle first and melt bottom to assure a sturdy placement. As the votive wax melts, the spilling will add to the bottom’s sensation with each breath they take. This may remind the bottom to stay still during this fun play, or not. Imagine your canvas topped with coloured votives slowly spilling wax down the sides of body, chest, and waist. Votives can also be placed in glass containers and allowed to pool and then be poured on the body for a heavenly warm sensation.

Container application is accomplished by tilting the holder enough that the wax pours out of the top. Try not to allow the flame to touch the opposite side of glass, which will produce soot on that area. If this happens, just wipe with towel after is cools. It is important to allow time for the wax to pool, therefore it is recommended to have numerous container candles.

Wax Bath/Vat application is accomplished by using a paintbrush, a ladle, or even your hands. Have a drip plate available to catch extra wax dripping off the brush. To create darker colours apply multiple layers of wax; allow each layer to harden before applying the next. The ladle allows for more flow of wax. For a full hands on play, use your own hands, cupped, to scoop up the wax and spread it onto the skin of your partner. Having your hands sensually exploring, pinching, and rubbing.

CLEAN UP

Using a wet ice cube to chill the wax on the skin is an easy way to remove wax. It is also a nice double sensation of mediums. To peel the wax off, use a knife, scraper, or a fine edge to loosen the edges and then grab it with your fingers and gently pull the wax over itself. A plastic scraper is useful to get the small areas of wax left over on the skin. The scrubbie will also get off the small bits of wax remaining by gently rubbing it over the skin. To get wax out of hair, use a flea comb. It is not a good idea to use a leather flogger or whip to remove wax – it gets everywhere and also on your expensive toy. Besides, you just gave a pleasurable, relaxing, sensual, erotic, and luxurious play scene. Leave the stingy ouchies for another time.

Clean up is easy if you used plastic to cover any area beforehand. Do not re-use any wax you have taken off of skin. It is contaminated with skin flakes, oils, and dirt.

If wax got on your clothing, boil them in a large pot to release the wax from the fabric.

Any wax left in your hair will easily come off by showering with a conditioner.

(Source: invalidandorcorrupt, via fueledsir)